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Recovery from Opioid
Addiction is Possible

What is Methadone?

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) with methadone has been used for more than 50 years as the leading treatment for opioid addiction.

What is Buprenorphine?

Buprenorphine, commonly known by the brand name Suboxone®, is used to treat opioid addiction and prevent the misuse of illicit opiates.

How do I start treatment?

Change begins today. Take the first step and contact the BAART Programs location nearest you for more information or to make an appointment.

Where is BAART located?

BAART Programs offers medication-assisted treatment, counseling and supportive recovery services at 29 locations in 6 states, as well as partner locations across the country.

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“Coming here has really helped me put my life back together. I will be forever thankful for making the choice to walk in the door."

BAART Programs Patient, CA

BAART Programs has delivered quality outpatient medication-assisted treatment and counseling for more than 40 years.

Our addiction treatment specialists understand that opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease and recognize the support our patients need to be successful in their recovery. We believe people have the ability to change their lives with the right treatment program and support system.

Our commitment to provide patients with affordable, quality, evidence-based treatment options has allowed us to help thousands of patients recover from opioid addiction. Our staff is experienced in supporting patients through the challenges of recovery, helping them to overcome those challenges and live happier, more productive lives.

The BAART continuum of care includes opioid treatment programs, behavioral health services and integrated primary care in select locations. Through these services and our connections to resources within the communities we serve, we have helped patients recover from opiate use disorder and improve their overall quality of life.

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What can I expect during treatment at BAART Programs?

Access to medical staff able to address health concerns and ensure all patients receive an effective dose of medication for the treatment of opioid use disorder.

Substance use counseling to build a treatment plan that will help address the challenges of the past and identify goals for the future.

Education on addiction, medication-assisted treatment, relapse prevention and healthy coping mechanisms.

Information and guidance about HIV, AIDS and Hepatitis C testing and referrals for other medical treatment as needed.

Supportive, quality treatment in an environment built on dignity and respect for all patients.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is methadone?

Methadone is an opioid medication commonly used to treat opiate addiction and relieve pain. It is not, however, used to treat other non-opiate drug addictions to substances like alcohol, marijuana or cocaine. Methadone blocks the receptors in the brain that are affected by opiates, such as prescription pain pills and heroin, enabling users to experience a more gradual detox process rather than a more extreme and painful withdrawal process. Methadone is available in the form of a pill or oral solution, and has been available in the US for more than 65 years.

Methadone reduces the drug cravings and harsh withdrawal symptoms that are often associated with a patient’s relapse, without creating the sense of euphoria associated with the abuse of opiates. Methadone’s effects last between 24 and 36 hours, and therefore most patients benefit from a single daily dose.

What is buprenorphine?

Subutex and Suboxone® (buprenorphine) were approved for the treatment of opiate addiction by the FDA in 2000. It may be used as a short term withdrawal medication or as a longer term maintenance medication. It offers a more flexible and less restrictive form of opiate medication therapy than methadone, but it is equally effective in treating addiction and normalizing brain opiate function. Unlike methadone, physicians may write a prescription for Suboxone® which the patient can simply take to any pharmacy. For some patients there may also be less side effects than methadone. Regular physician medication visits should be supplemented by participation in a counseling program.

Suboxone® is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone (also known as Narcan). Naloxone is an opioid antagonist, which is used to counter the effects of an opiate overdose as well as the euphoric feelings associated with opiate use.

Methadone reduces the drug cravings and harsh withdrawal symptoms that are often associated with a patient’s relapse, without creating the sense of euphoria associated with the abuse of opiates. Methadone’s effects last between 24 and 36 hours, and therefore most patients benefit from a single daily dose.

What is the difference?

Buprenorphine, the active ingredient in Suboxone®, and methadone are both opioids, and activate the opioid receptors on nerve cells. Both are long acting medications, and that makes them very useful for the purposes of opiate addiction treatment. However, there are very key differences that distinguish these two medications from one another.

Methadone is a full mu opioid agonist. This means simply that it will continue to produce its effects on the opioid receptors until all receptors are fully activated or the maximum effect is reached. This is similar to the way heroin impacts the brain as it is also a full agonist. Methadone however, once the right dosage is achieved, can eliminate the euphoric effects felt from illicit use, without allowing the painful effects of having too low of a dose of methadone.

Buprenorphine is what is called a partial agonist, which means it does not activate the mu receptors to the same level as methadone. The effects felt have a ceiling, meaning they will not reach and excessively pleasurable level, no matter how much the dose is increased. Buprenorphine or Suboxone®, can still have effects on respiration and minimal euphoric feelings, but not near to the extent of full agonists.

Methadone reduces the drug cravings and harsh withdrawal symptoms that are often associated with a patient’s relapse, without creating the sense of euphoria associated with the abuse of opiates.

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